K-12 miniMOOC Proposal

I have been following the recent “MOOC” trend (Massive Open Online Course) and I was wondering if I could create a “mini MOOC”. I have been wondering why the MOOC idea has not been offered to the K-12 community. If it has- where and how?

A few weeks ago, I had the pleasure of listening to Dr.Alec Couros discuss Digital Citizenship and leaving a digital footprint from a k-12 perspective. His Elluminate session is here: Dr.Couros Elluminate Session This week Dr. George Veletsianos presents his ideas on Scholar’s participation and practices online.

Based on the scholar conversation this week,  I now have the confidence to question “who” a scholar really is in this educational network? How can I encourage the 21st Century Scholar?

I have been considering what a “MOOC” would look like in the k-12 online classroom. I began to ponder….

1) How can we offer digital opportunities, or  a version of “Networked Participatory Scholarship” to all students in any K-12 classrooms?

2) What can I do as a parent to offer EdTEch support at home?

Well- Why not start with a very short “mini” MOOC, maybe 6 weeks, with parents and students doing it together? Since the whole focus of education is engaging the learner and encouraging them to be independent learners…and it may or may not be offered in the classroom….why not offer it online to “families”? Start with the Elementary parents and students…at the bottom….and see what response I get?

The theme could be “My Digital Footprint”

We would meet in Blackboard Elluminate each week…and…..

We could ask the “families” to create a blog that we could link to a wiki or ePorfolio (like Mahara) – or use Desire2Learn…..

Each week the lesson would be short, and focus on one Web 2.0 tool…then we “watch” to see what the digital footprint may or may not look like…

A different “EdTech teacher” could present the lesson for the week……

Some possible themes could be….
week 1: Blog
week 2: ppt on slideshare
week 3: voicethread
week 4: youtube video
week 5: digital story

week 6: class presentations

Something to consider? What do you think?

Verena Roberts 🙂

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What about the Learners? #change11

Networked Participatory Scholarship: Emergent techno-cultural pressures towardopen and digital scholarship in online networks By: George Veletsianos and Royce Kimmons

But……what about the “Learners?”

Although I realize that the focus on this week’s discussion (and most weeks) is on Post Secondary Education, I really felt that the word “learner” was missing in the article cited above.

Although I am a MET student and working on my second Masters degree- I don’t consider myself a scholar.

In fact, if I reflect upon the idea of a “Networked Participatory Sholarship” I think about K-12 students who naturally collaborate by using social networking tools, digital tools and web 2.o tools to create new learning opportunities.

These “learners” (or digital natives as Prensky calls them ) aren’t worried about their tenure based on the number of journal articles that they have written OR if a journal article is really academic based on the number of citations. Instead, they are changing the way we “think” about “academic research and institutional educational as a whole by learning in a whole new way. No, they are not data collecting as they go, and probably don’t even know they are doing it, but they are the true Educational Innovators in 2012.

I agree we need to think about why tenured professors and K-12 Teachers are still not integrating technology into the classrooms by not encouraging “Networked Participatory Scholarship”. However, I think that the leaders and strongest “academic scholars” are the k-12 students, and non-scholars (as defined in the article). We have already followed the lead of the non-scholars, but maybe we haven’t admitted it.

So why create a heirarchy between scholars, learners and others? Instead start focusing on the mantra of Harold Rheingold http://change.mooc.ca/post/529 and start considering how the “Scholars” of the world may be considered the “others” if they don’t learn how to become Net Smart.

I agree- there are two very different “Schools” of thought represented in Education today – across the board. My vote is for the “learners” and those who follow the Rheingold’s of the world.

Verena 🙂

Parent -Home -School Partnership

Just found this great blog post on how a school connected with its parents to create supportive learning environments at home and at school. Very well written with research.

http://paradigmshift21.edublogs.org/2010/11/27/successful-parent-involvement-a-shift-in-home-school-partnership/

Leadership and Innovation – #Chang11

This week chang#11 is focusing on leadership in a time of innovation. As a member of the leadership team working with online education, I agree with many of the comments about the skills that are required as a 21st century “tech” leader in our readings. Most recently, my team completed a project to create a “new online model” to teach ESL online. We had to take a collaborative, team based approach that focused on the strengths of our members and “covered” the weaknesses. What we were able to do in a few short months, astounded me, because we worked in what is described as a “High Performance Teams” in the Wisdom of Teams by Katzenbach & Smith.

Collaboration and team work in technology is not only a “Educational Leadership” focus, it is being examined across the workplace. But like in Education,

“As is so often the case with applications, the biggest obstacles to successful integration of collaboration tools into most companies are a resistant corporate culture and insufficient support—not problems with technology or security. Executives, it turns out, use few collaboration technologies, relying primarily on e-mail and telephony. Young people are quick to adopt new technologies, and they often lead the charge at work. But don’t rely solely on young employees. More-seasoned employees do a better job sniffing out the applications that have the biggest business impact.”( Alter,2008)

Being an educational leader is a time of change means being open to resistance and being aware of the  time it takes and stages to a change cycle. As Fullan suggests, Like the business leader, the principal of the future – the Cultural Change Principal – must be attuned to the big picture, a sophisticated conceptual thinker who transforms the organization through people and teams (2001)

Change Cycle: From http://positivepsychologynews.com/news/dana-arakawa/20071014444

I guess I struggle with the principal being at the center of change and ultimately leadership. I really believe that the leaders of today – those that are in the mddle of change and yet leading the way- are our students.  The people who choose to follow the vision of these students are the real educational leaders of today.

Verena

Fullan, M. (2001). Leading in a culture of change. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Alter, A. http://mobile.cioinsight.com/c/a/Research/Collaboration-Unlocking-the-Power-of-Teams/

http://www.n2growth.com/blog/leadership-change/

#change11 – Digital Citizenship

A MOOC is a free online course facilitated by cutting edge EdTech professionals from around the world. The topics are technology focused, and they are facilitated using a connectivist and constructivist approach.

This is the link to the #change11 course

Yesterday, I had the pleasure of listening to Dr.Alec Couros discuss Digital Citezenship and leaving a digital footprint from a k-12 perspective. His Ellumintae session is here: Dr.Couros Elluminate Session

I work as a consultant for www.GlobalEd.ca. That means that I am involved with supporting the curriculum development  and implementation with online courses- offered Internationally.

Since learning about the MOOC process, I have been considering what a “MOOC” would look like in the k-12 online classroom. Based on Alec Couros’ Digital Citizenship presentation…I began to ponder

1) How can we offer digital opportunities to all students in the K-12 classrooms?

2) What can I do as a parent to offer EdtEch support at home?

Well- Why not start with a very short “mini” MOOC, maybe 6 weeks, with parents and students doing it together? Since the whole focus of education is engaging the learner and encouraging them to be independent learners…and it may or may not be offered in the classroom….why not offer it online to “families”? Start with the Elementary parents and students…at the bottom….and see what response I get?

The theme could be “My Digital Footprint”
The “model” might not be as “all over” as regular MOOC courses, due to my own personal limitations on learning analytics at this point….
We could ask the “families” to create a blog that we could link to a wiki or ePorfolio (like Mahara)
Each week the lesson would be much shorter, and focus on one Web 2.0 tool…then we “watch” to see what the digital footprint may or may not look like…

A different “EdTech teacher” could present the lesson for the week……

Some possible themes could be….
week 1: Blog
week 2: ppt on slideshare
week 3: voicethread
week 4: youtube video
week 5: digital story

week 6: class presentations

Something to consider?

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